Victoria Madden

Executive Summary

Tory Madden was awarded her undergraduate degree with a distinction and two class prizes.  She worked as a physiotherapist for five years, rapidly progressing to a senior clinical and management role.  She was then accepted into a doctoral programme with the Body in Mind research group, an internationally influential research team in the field of pain research, and successfully obtained competitive funding from South Africa to support these studies in Australia.  Her PhD work was part of a programme of studies that won a prestigious Australian award for innovation and the potential to transform health care.  As part of her PhD studies, Tory spent 3 months at Prof Johan Vlaeyen’s lab at the University of Leuven. Her PhD thesis contained 6 first-author manuscripts and was completed within 3 years.  Tory was awarded her PhD without any corrections and won a university prize for her thesis. 

Tory’s interest in chronic pain was sparked by cross-cultural work in rural South Africa, where she treated many patients with poorly managed pain.  She identified a lack of knowledge about pain in the South African medical system - particularly an inability to modify Western-developed management approaches for rural African cultures.  She studied in Australia to acquire skills and experience to take back to her home country, where she has continued in research in order to progress knowledge of pain in South Africa, maintained and extend her work with international collaborators, particularly those in Belgium and Australia.  In keeping with this goal, Tory was awarded an Innovation Postdoctoral Fellowship by the South African National Research Foundation, and she later won a collaborative research grant from the International Association for the Study of Pain.  Tory's postdoctoral research at the University of Cape Town investigates the possibility that psychosocial stress and resilience modulate the persistence of pain after tissue healing.  Her research question is important in South Africa, with its particularly high levels of psychosocial stress and interpersonal violence, and relevant to the global effort to better understand the relationships between psychosocial factors and the persistence of pain.

Awards

2017

International Association for the Study of Pain’s collaborative research grant for a project involving developing and developed countries

2016

Thesis of the Year prize, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia

2016

Financial aid award from the International Association for the Study of Pain to attend the World Congress on Pain

2016

Best free paper presentation, Pain South Africa Congress

2015

Innovation Postdoctoral Fellowship award, National Research Foundation, South Africa

2015

University of South Australia completion scholarship

2015

Best free paper presentation, Pain South Africa Congress

2015

Merit Recipient - South Australian iAwards for ICT innovation (Research and Development Category)

2014

University of South Australia Travel Award for research trip to Belgium in 2015

2014

Scholarship to attend the World Congress on Pain from the Pain, Mind and Movement special interest group of the International Association for the Study of Pain

2014,6

South African Society of Physiotherapy scholarships to attend World Congress on Pain

2014

University of South Australia conference scholarship

2013-2015

Oppenheimer Memorial Trust Award for Postgraduate Study

2009, 2012

South African Society of Physiotherapy conference scholarships

2009

“Most surprising research presentation”, South African Society of Physiotherapy Congress

Peer-reviewed publications

Madden, V.J., Bellan, V., Russek, L.N., Camfferman, D., Vlaeyen, J.W.S. and Moseley, G.L. “Pain by association? Experimental modulation of human pain thresholds using classical conditioning.” 2016. Journal of Pain 17(10):1105-1115.

Madden, V.J., Russek, L.N., Harvie. D.S., Vlaeyen, J.W.S. and Moseley, G.L. “Classical Conditioning Fails to Elicit Allodynia in an Experimental Study with Healthy Humans.” Pain Medicine, Advance Access. Published online: 28 Sept 2016.

Madden, V.J., Harvie, D.S., Parker, R., Vlaeyen, J.W.S., Moseley, G.L. and Stanton, T.R. “Can pain or hyperalgesia be a classically conditioned response in humans?  A systematic review and meta-analysis.” 2016. Pain Medicine 17(6): 1094-1111. 

Madden, V.J., Catley, M.J., Grabherr, L., Mazzola, F., Shohag, M. and Moseley, G.L.  “The effect of repeated laser stimuli to ink-marked skin on skin temperature – recommendations for a safe experimental protocol in humans.” 2016. PeerJ 4; e1577.

Madden, V.J. and Moseley, G.L. “Do clinicians think that pain can be a classically conditioned response to a non-noxious stimulus?” 2016. Manual Therapy 22:165-173.

Zaman, J., Madden, V.J., Iven, J., Wiech, K., Weltens, N., Giao Ly, H., Vlaeyen, J.W.S., Van Oudenhove, L. and Van Diest, I. “Biased intensity judgements of visceral sensations after fear learning to visceral stimuli: a drift diffusion approach.” 2017. Journal of Pain, May 19.

Chalmers, K.J., Madden, V.J., Hutchinson, M.R. and Moseley, G.L. “Local and Systemic Inflammation in Localized, Provoked Vestibulodynia: A Systematic Review.” 2016. Obstetrics & Gynecology 128(2):337-347.

Parker, R., Burgess, S., Dubaniewicz, D., Gouws, L-J., Krone, J., Madden, V., Nortje, C. & Parsons, C. “Patient satisfaction following participation in a pilot chronic pain management programme in Cape Town, South Africa.” 2009.
South African Journal of Physiotherapy 65(1).  

Madden, V.J., O’Sullivan, P.B., Fisher, J., Malambule, B. “‘Our training left us unprepared’ – Two physiotherapists’ reflections on working with women with low back pain in a rural Zulu community in South Africa.” Journal of Community and Health Sciences, September 2013.

Parker, R & Madden, V.J. “Ultrasound versus sham ultrasound for experimentally induced Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness: a double-blind controlled trial.” 2014. South African Journal of Sports Medicine 26(4):99-103.

Harvie, D.S., Broecker, M., Smith, R.T., Meulders, A., Madden, V.J., Moseley, G.L. “Bogus visual feedback alters onset of movement-evoked pain in people with neck pain.” 2015. Psychological Science, 26(4):385-392.

Harvie, D.S., Madden, V.J., Meulders, A., Hillier, S.L., Broecker, M., Smith, R., Moseley, G.L. “Neck pain and proprioception revisited using the proprioception incongruence detection test.” 2016. Physical Therapy 96(5): 671-678.

Harvie, D.S., Meulders, A., Madden, V.J., Hillier, S.L., Peto, D.K., Brinkworth, R., Moseley, G.L. “When touch predicts pain: predictive tactile cues modulate perceived intensity of painful stimulation independent of expectancy.” 2016. Scandinavian Journal of Pain 11:11-18.

Selected peer-reviewed conference posters

Madden V.J., Catley, M.J., Bellan, V., Russek, L.N., Camffermann, D., Moseley, G.L. “The FESTNRS – a new numerical rating scale to assess non-painful and painful experiences in humans.” Poster, 16th World Congress on Pain, Yokohama, October 2016.

 

Madden, V.J., Russek, L.N., Harvie, D.S., Vlaeyen, J.W., Moseley, G.L. “Can classical conditioning elicit allodynia responses in healthy humans?” Poster, European Meeting on Human Fear Conditioning, Bochum, Germany, May 2015.

 

Madden, V.J., Harvie, D.S., Stanton, T.S., Parker, R., Vlaeyen, J.W., Moseley, G.L. “Can pain or hyperalgesia be a classically conditioned response?  A systematic review and meta-analysis.” Poster, 15th World Congress on Pain, Buenos Aires, October 2014, and PainAdelaide 4th annual scientific meeting, March 2015.

Madden, V.J., Catley, M., Grabherr, L., Mazzola, F., Shohag, M., Moseley, G.L. “Perceptual habituation and skin temperature stability with repeated noxious laser stimuli.” Poster, 15th World Congress on Pain, Buenos Aires, October 2014, and and PainAdelaide 4th annual scientific meeting, March 2015.

Bowering, K.J, Madden, V.J., Moseley, G.L., Evans, S.F. “What are the characteristics of the inflammatory components of PVD?  A systematic review.” Poster, 15th World Congress on Pain, Buenos Aires, October 2014, and PainAdelaide 4th annual scientific meeting, March 2015.

Harvie, D.S., Broecker, M., Smith, R.T., Meulders, A., Madden, V.J., Moseley, G.L. “Bogus visual feedback alters movement-evoked pain onset in people with neck pain.” Poster, 15th World Congress on Pain, Buenos Aires, October 2014, and PainAdelaide 4th annual scientific meeting, March 2015.

 

Conference invitations

2017

Pain by Association?  The classical conditioning framework for pain (PainCloud convention, Oslo, Norway)

2017

When nociception is not enough: what we know and what we don’t (Pain South Africa Congress 2017)

2017

Workshop: Clinical assessment and reasoning for complex pain (Pain South Africa Congress 2017)

2016

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: an update (Perioperative Pain Symposium, University of Cape Town)

2015

Graded motor imagery for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (Pain South Africa / Pain, Mind and Movement SIG congress 2015, South Africa)

2015

Can pain be a classically conditioned response? (PainAdelaide 4th annual scientific meeting, Adelaide, Australia)

2011

Rehabilitating patients after upper limb amputation (South African Society for Surgery of the Hand’s Congress and  Refresher Course, Bloemfontein, South Africa)

Conference presentations

2017

“Learning of fear; learning of pain?”  In the focused symposium entitled “Pain – subjective experience” delivered with Prof F Reis and Prof T Wideman. (World Confederation for Physical Therapy congress, Cape Town)

2016

The FESTNRS – a new numerical ratings scale to assess non-painful and painful experiences in humans (Presentation at business meeting of the International Association for the Study of Pain’s “Pain, Mind and Movement” Special Interest Group)

2016

Free paper session at PainSA Congress 2016

2015

Free paper session at PainSA/Pain, Mind and Movement Congress 2015

2014

Can pain or hyperalgesia be a classically conditioned response?  A systematic review and meta-analysis (Presentation at business meeting of the International Association for the Study of Pain’s “Pain, Mind and Movement” Special Interest Group)

2009

Back pain in women: how do lifestyle and cultural factors affect physiotherapy in rural Northern
KwaZulu-Natal? (South African Society of Physiotherapy Congress)

2007

Preliminary results: clinical audit of the Chronic Pain Management Programme at Groote Schuur Hospital Physiotherapy Department (Academic meeting for UCT Physiotherapy Department’s 50th anniversary)

Clinical Audit

2006-2007

Clinical audit of the Chronic Pain Management Programme run by Groote Schuur Hospital Physiotherapy Department (results published as above).

Teaching

2017

Senior lecturer: Postgraduate Diploma in Interdisciplinary Pain Management

2016-7

Pain Interventions course for the Train Pain Academy

2017

Medical Communication course for the Train Pain Academy

2016

Lecturer: 1st year Movement Science course at University of Cape Town

2016

Certified instructor of Essential Pain Management educational intervention

2014-5

Teaching and assessment: 3rd year Pain Sciences course at University of South Australia

2014

Individual tutor via the Indigenous Students Assistance Scheme, for physiotherapy students,
University of South Australia

2013-4

Private tutoring: Neuroanatomy and Human Anatomy courses, University of South Australia

2013

Teaching assistant and practical examiner: 1st and 2nd year Physiotherapy Studies courses (massage, musculoskeletal and electrophysical agents), University of South Australia

2009

Group tutor: 3rd year Movement Science for BSc (Physiotherapy), University of Cape Town

Community engagement

2014-7

Associate editor, BodyinMind.org.  This role involves working with authors towards a blog post that is appropriate for the audience and is true to the objectives of the website.

BodyinMind has published over 600 blog posts which are mainly focussed on discussing recent evidence-based pain research. On a monthly basis it has 25,000 visitors (20,000 unique) from over 130 countries and nearly 200 subscribers.  Klout measures online engagement with social media sites. 

BodyinMind’s Klout score is 58, making it the world's most influential pain-related web and social media presence, significantly more than the International Association for the Study of Pain (Klout score 42).

2017

Associate director: Train Pain Academy.  This is a non-profit organisation that provides training to healthcare clinicians to improve understanding and clinical management of pain.

2014-7

Secretary on the Executive Board of the Pain, Mind and Movement Special Interest Group (International Association for the Study of Pain)

2017

Organised and hosted the first University of Cape Town Pain Symposium with three international speakers.  This event was the first of its kind, was open to the public and was attended by over 100 people.

2012

Branch committee member: Pain Management Physiotherapy Group of South Africa

Supervision of research students

2016-7

Co-supervisor: Kerwin Talbot, PhD candidate (under examination) at University of South Australia

2017

Co-supervisor: Juliane Traxler, Masters student (under examination) at University of Leuven

2017

Co-supervisor: Katleho Limakatso, Masters student at University of Cape Town

2016

Co-supervisor: Emma Fletcher, Honours student at University of South Australia

Next Event

Group Interventions (Module 5)

Facilitated by: Romy Parker & Melissa Saw

16 & 17 August 2019

Johannesburg, South Africa

About Us

Train Pain is a non-profit organisation that provides innovative pain education for transforming health practise.

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